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Success Team
THE SECRET OF SUCCESS - STOP DREAMING AND START DOING!

“As a child I dreamed. But I stopped dreaming and started doing.
Because it's the power of DOING that makes dreams happen.”

- Usain Bolt, Jamaican Olympic and World sprint champion
Monday 11:33am
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Jacinta Kioko   I agree. The more important is to start the doing.
21 hours ago  · 
Fulgence Habyarimana   100%
20 hours ago  · 
0
Amitabh Bachan
Success would be worthless, if you are NOT healthy. Right?
20 hours ago
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Amitabh Bachan   Work hard for your health, as you do for your success in life
20 hours ago  · 
Fulgence Habyarimana   Imagine a super success which arrives and finds you in a hospital bed!
20 hours ago  · 
0
William Kaboro
There is some gold here below...

THE SCIENCE OF PROSPERITY, POVERTY, AND WELLBEING
(Daily Nation-Feb 2013)

(IN SUMMARY
Biology and economics aside, there is a greater concern on the implication of living either a life of affluence or sheer want on the general wellbeing of an individual. Do poor people lead less satisfying lives? Are they less fulfilled? Do those in the upper class lead better lives?)

Every morning, Robert Mutunga wakes up at 5am in Shauri Moyo and walks to Bazaar Plaza in the city, where he works as a security guard. Robert reports to duty at 6am and stays on until 6pm, when he walks back to the estate. By doing this, he saves Sh40 daily on fare but receives tea and lunch, which are deducted from his Sh6,000 monthly salary to bring his earnings to Sh5,450.

He pays Sh2,500 rent for a house in which he lives with his younger brother and cousin. All the expenses of food and accommodation are on him. Leisure spending is alien in his world.

On the other side of Nairobi, five days a week, a silver-grey Mitsubishi Pajero pulls over at around 7.15am at the junction of Miotoni and Ngong roads, just before the Karen shopping centre. There is a man seated back left and the driver usually rolls down the window and takes two copies of the local dailies from the vendors operating near a “NO THROUGH WAY” sign before driving towards town. Miotoni, you see, is a private road.

It leads to a section of Karen with concrete fences, imposing metal gates, and security guards. Inside the compounds are manicured lawns and spectacular buildings. Here people live in homes. Life is cushioned by all the comforts that money can buy. The residents probably own big shares in companies listed at the Nairobi Securities Exchange, work few hours, take vacations in France twice a year, and are chauffeured around town.

The haves and have nots

During the first Kenyan presidential debate last week, the words “poverty” and “poor” were uttered by the eight presidential aspirants and members of the audience 14 times, and the words “elite” and “rich” were equally popular.

During the 15-minute-or-so commercial break, an advertisement sponsored by the Mkenya Daima lobby group featured a woman talking about walala hai and walala hoi — “the haves” and “the have nots”, or, even better, those who swim in prosperity and those who languish in poverty.

This time more than ever, the question of social stratification and its implications has dominated the campaign period, but it is not a Kenyan peculiarity. Last year, from Tahrir Square to Athens, from Moscow to Wall Street, thousands of people gathered in protest to bring down dictatorships and systems that divided those societies into two blocks — the poor and the prosperous.

Social stratification is largely a perception of individuals within that particular society. Ideally, access to basic needs, availability of opportunities, and equitable distribution of resources, wealth, and income ought to be attainable. But the reality is that the world presents unlimited poverty alongside wanton prosperity. With this come implications. For instance, children born into poverty experience low growth rates and eventually, most of them attain lower average heights compared to those from well-off families.

Biology and economics aside, there is a greater concern on the implications of living either a life of prosperity or poverty on the general wellbeing of an individual. Do poor people lead less satisfying lives? Are they less fulfilled? Do those in the upper class lead better lives? How do Robert and the mystery man in the Pajero feel in terms of wellbeing?

We asked Mandy Parkin those questions. The founder of Lighthouse Fitness and Wellbeing Centre said that the total balance of a person’s wellbeing comes when there is “oneness of the body, soul, and mind”. Generally, a blissful state that is not dependent on externalities and the individual has to live in the present.

A positive state of wellbeing and happiness are the results of internal balance of spiritual and physical demands that arise when one has realised their purpose in life. Money and material possessions ease life, but do not translate directly to happiness. Contentment of the body and the spirit are what led Jesus, Mandela, Mother Teresa, Gandhi, and Martin Luther to continue their quest for human wellbeing at the expense of their own comfort.

This is not the kind of information palatable to our modern secularist approach to life, which glorifies material possessions.

But, as Dr Lucas Mwaura, a lecturer of abnormal psychology and forensic psychology at the University of Nairobi, will tell you, there is a need for the society to re-think the concepts on prosperity and what entails a healthy state of wellbeing.

The don argues that people pursue wealth and materialism for various reasons that work together, that those who obsess about wealth and material prosperity and pursue and accumulate it incessantly are driven by personal insecurity and are bound by societal expectations.

Most of them are also dissatisfied with their achievements and believe that conquering more would lead to the acceptance (by the society) of their performance.

If this is bad, then the self-esteem crisis that these people suffer is even worse.

“Self-esteem has two components; self-concept and self-image. Self-concept is an individual’s self-proximation from what other people, those around them, say about them. Ordinarily, it makes up about 20 per cent of a person’s self-esteem. Self-image is the individual’s proximation from within and takes the other 80 per cent,” Dr Mwaura explains.

Incessant obsession

However, for those who obsess about prosperity and material possessions, self-concept lies at about 60 per cent and self-image at about 40 per cent. The more prosperous most individuals become, the more they lose self-image. The shift of the focus of what is important is what feeds the incessant obsession.

Mandy, a yoga teacher, calls it “ego fix”. The ego, being a tiny, vulnerable mortal thing in all of us that is afraid of change since change is unpredictable, creates a particular hollowness that needs to be constantly filled. The feeding, which depends on the past or the future, never stops since this hollowness is abysmal and imaginary. This creates obsessive tendencies like blind accumulation of wealth in some people.

What would happen if the affluent mystery man in the Pajero were to receive damning news about his property, news that would condemn him to poverty? A lot, especially in his brain.
Dr Pius Kigamwa, a psychiatrist at Nairobi Hospital and lecturer at the University of Nairobi’s School of Medicine, says that when the brain of the affluent man receives such news, it responds as it would to a traumatic experience. It would produce catecholamine, dopamine, serotonin, and noradrenalin, chemicals that deal with adversity. But they have to balance the amount of stress produced by the bad news. Too much may cause hallucinations and mental instability. Too little may cause depression, withdrawal, and reclusion.

Central reward system

Robert, the security guard, when surprised with abrupt affluence and material possession, say, hitting a Sh10 million jackpot in a lottery, would behave in an almost similar manner, but this time out of excitement.

“Dopamine is central to the reward system of the brain,” explains Dr Kigamwa. “Robert would experience sudden surges of the chemical in the brain, and these surges would create mania, which would lead to distortion of thinking and perception.” Not surprisingly, Robert might “go bonkers” on receiving such news.

A casual look at bookshops in the city reveals that our society’s quest for wealth dominates the shelves. Most bookshops have three to four shelves dedicated to motivational (inspirational), money, and management books. Interesting texts on wealth creation, success in business, and investment crowd the shelves. Street book sellers have tales to tell about how short the street life of a book on money, investment, and success is. From Moneygym to Rich Dad Poor Dad, from The Richest Man in Babylon to The One Minute Millionaire, these books fly out of the vendors’ hands at astonishing speeds.

Dr Tom Namwamba, a philosophy lecturer at Kenyatta University, believes that happiness is delinked from all things material.

In his words, “When one releases his/her mind to understand the purpose and essence of their existence, they will understand the rhythm and harmony of human life.

“Wellbeing and happiness are products of spiritual and psychological comfort and the ability to live and co-exist with others.”

Ancient great thinkers like Plato and Socrates or founders of great religions like Jesus and Mohamed, Dr Namwamba says, were men who rose above mere existence for existence’s sake and found peace and happiness in understanding what their purpose in life was. This, he says, is the reason, regardless of the temptations they received to acquire material possession, they stayed true, courageous, and even contented in death.

Low stress levels

Dr Namwamba postulates that Robert, the security guard who earns Sh5,450, has low stress levels and is satisfied with his life because he meets most of his essential needs and is happy at the fact that he works hard at meeting those needs.

A wealth-chasing man is constantly unavailable and will have a family that lives in turmoil. His children, due to lack of or inadequate parental guidance and father figure in their life, will be confused, miserable, and misguided. His wife, out of neglect, will be miserable and sad and may seek solace elsewhere (wih another man), remain despondent, or file for divorce, taking with her half his wealth since she will have realised that the money is not a substitute for happiness. This man lacks peace of mind and opens doors to lifestyle ailments.

“This man will probably end up in a vegetative state in hospital supported by beeping machines, care that costs hundreds of thousands of shillings. The poor fellow will still be walking to work.

And if you ask me, I would say that the walking man, regardless of whether he does so on an empty stomach or not, is the happier one,” says Dr Mwaura.

If the concepts of poverty and prosperity in relation to wellbeing are misunderstood, it all starts when they are associated with secularist and material perspectives. Those who attempt to separate them are likely to have fulfilled and happy lives.
16 hours ago
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3
Sb Onetwothree
WHO ARE YOUR FRIENDS?
22 hours ago
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Jacinta Kioko   If you keep the company of lazybones, how can you do any better, surely?
21 hours ago  · 
Amitabh Bachan   Like attracts like.
20 hours ago  · 
3
William Kaboro
DO UNTO OTHERS, NOW, AS YOU WOULD LIKE DONE UNTO YOU, IN FUTURE

A frail old man lived with his son, his daughter-in-law, and his four-year-old grandson. His eyes were blurry, his hands trembled, and his step faltered.

The family would eat together nightly at the dinner table. But the elderly grandfather's shaky hands and failing sight made eating rather difficult. Peas rolled off his spoon, drooping to the floor. When he grasped his glass of milk, it often spilled clumsily at the tablecloth.

With this happening almost every night, the son and daughter-in-law became irritated with the mess.

"We must do something about grandfather," said the son.

"I've had enough of his milk spilling, noisy eating and food on the floor," the daughter-in-law agreed.

So the couple set a small table at the corner.

There, grandfather ate alone while the rest of the family enjoyed their dinner at the dinner table. Since grandfather had broken a dish or two, his food was served in wooden bowls. Sometimes when the family glanced in grandfather's direction, he had a tear in his eye as he ate alone. Still, the only words the couple had for him were sharp admonitions when he dropped a fork or spilled food. The four-year-old watched it all in silence.

One evening, before supper, the father noticed his son playing with wood scraps on the floor. He asked the child sweetly: "What are you making?" Just as sweetly, the boy replied, "Oh, I'm making a little bowl for you and mama to eat your food from when I grow up." The four-year-old smiled and went back to work.

These words so struck the parents that they were speechless. Then tears streamed down their cheeks. Though no words were spoken, both knew what must be done. That evening, the husband took grandfather's hand and gently led him back to the family table.

For the remainder of his days, grandfather ate every meal with the family. And for some reason, neither husband nor wife seemed to care any longer when a fork was dropped, milk was spilled or the table cloth was soiled...
23 hours ago
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Christine Otieno   Look deep into the future while making your plans. Otherwise, you will be surprised!
21 hours ago  · 
3
Christine Otieno
Life is the toughest school!
Monday 5:40pm
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Jacinta Kioko   You cannot copy!
21 hours ago  · 
Amitabh Bachan   Life is a tough school, BUT you are created complete with tools to hack it in life.
20 hours ago  · 
4
William Kaboro
THE GREATEST INSPIRATION - FROM THE HOLY BIBLE!

“So Jesus said to them, “It is because of your unbelief;
for assuredly I say to you, if you have FAITH as a mustard seed,
you will say to this mountain, 'Move from here to there,'
and it will move; and NOTHING WILL BE IMPOSSIBLE for you."

- Gospel of Matthew, 17:20
Monday 11:29am
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Christine Otieno   Yeeeeesssss!
Monday 5:39pm  · 
Jacinta Kioko   As usual, the tough thing is to act.
21 hours ago  · 
2
Kelvin Kariuki
Secrets to winning politics in Kenya.
1.Propaganda-30%
2.money-60%
3.false promises-10%

How many agree with me?
Mar 22, 2017
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Alice Khumalo   True
Monday 11:36am  · 
Mwaniki Albert   Absolutely
Monday 3:40pm  · 
0
Alice Khumalo
STUPID, BRAGGING ROBBER!

The alleged heist kingpin who bought himself a R5 million Lamborghini after the OR Tambo International Airport robbery posted pictures of his new toy on social media.
Mar 22, 2017
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Christine Otieno   Mwizi nugu
Monday 5:39pm  · 
Mwaniki Albert   Hahaha! Pride really comes before a fall what a fool
Tuesday 1:11am  · 
3
Amitabh Bachan
NOTHING IS MORE IMPORTANT IN LIFE THAN HEALTH!
Mar 22, 2017
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Elvis Otieno   True! Health first.
Mar 22, 2017  · 
Alice Khumalo   Yes!
Mar 22, 2017  · 
1
Elvis Otieno
Mar 22, 2017
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